Bowdoin College

Overview

A liberal arts education at Bowdoin isn’t about being small and safe. It’s about having the support to take surprising risks. Students undertake this journey with professors who are scholars and artists of distinction who actively shape their fields. From their first-year seminar through their senior year, students are immersed in subjects with teachers who illuminate learning with passion for their disciplines. Faculty and students work together in small classes, labs, performance halls, and conduct real-world research in the field. Bowdoin, a community of diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences, is interested in students who respect and welcome the challenges associated with such diversity. 

The Bowdoin curriculum offers a realization of the Offer of the College for the twenty-first century. The College requires students to seek breadth and depth in their education. This style of education encourages principled and thoughtful engagement with the surrounding world, both during and after the four years on campus. Bowdoin students go on to be leaders in all walks of life.

Since its opening in 1802, Bowdoin has understood the responsibility to direct higher education toward the Common Good. The college’s first president, Joseph McKeen, emphasized that Bowdoin students have a particular obligation to exert their talents for the greater benefit of society. In the 21st century, that obligation is stronger than ever. Bowdoin challenges students to consider the implications of a shared natural world and human heritage through community engagement on local, national, and global levels.

 

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